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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: In My Tree
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 4:37 pm 
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Smile

Smile is a song about separation, yet never fully fleshes the feeling out. But don’t fret kiddies, for this benefits No Code at this point on the album. The previous four tracks all attempt to make a point about certain subject matter (faith, love, self, maturation), but Smile lets us off the hook for a bit of a breather. It has something to say, but says so fairly implicitly. You’re challenged to take the sparse lyrical content for what you will, and even if a thousand people all interpret it a thousand different ways, chances are that all their views are linked by the feeling that the song expresses. And that feeling is longing for someone, which is probably why the lyrics are left so ambiguous—we all long in our own unique manner.

Musically, Smile is quite reminiscent of classic Neil Young & Crazy Horse, almost overly-emphasized with the inclusion of the harmonica, which was a first for a studio track by Pearl Jam. Smiles stands up just fine without this added instrument, so why its inclusion? Historically, the harmonica is the instrument played by a sad, lonesome man singing the blues. Perhaps Smile is really just a blues song hidden under the guise of a rock exterior.

But what sets it apart from a typical blues song is the uplifting delivery of the chorus, both musically and vocally. Compared to the rest of the song’s thick rhythm guitar sound and baritone vocals, the chorus just soars. Read the lyrics to this song without music, and it’ll come off as real downer. Then listen to the song a few times, recognizing some of the musical nuances, and you’ll discover an entirely different perspective of Smile. To reiterate: feeling, my friends. Feeling. Not just in the sentiment, but in every aspect. The song never could have worked without it.

“Don’t it make you smile when the sun don’t shine?” The obvious answer to this is a big, fat “no.” What the fuck about a grey sky or darkness would make someone smile or emote some type of amusement? Someone waiting on the other side, of course. For the narrator, the sun may very well be shining, but he can’t see it because he’s separated from the person he loves for the time being. He’s drenched in darkness, left alone with his memory of this person as his only true light. He smiles because he knows he’ll see them again; where or when it left open to interpretation.

And then comes the chorus’ confession. He misses this person after only a short period of time, and the emotion constantly causes pangs. But the symbol of the sun not shining reaffirms that he will see them again—the sun can’t hide forever, and one day it will be bright again. But only upon their reunion.

Really, Smile is about hope. So maybe, just maybe, it’s not as separated from the other tracks of No Code as I previously mentioned. The sun may not be shining, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a bright side.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: In My Tree
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 5:31 pm 
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dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
SmileBut the symbol of the sun not shining reaffirms that he will see them again—the sun can’t hide forever, and one day it will be bright again. But only upon their reunion.


I like that part ^.

And i love Smile :)

I do however think that the song wouldn't stand up quite so well without the harmonica...It serves as such a great lift to the music - without it, it's all just minor chords for the verses. In fact i think the harmonica parts are probably the happiest pieces of music in PJ's catalogue (and have you noticed how crazy everyone goes after Ed's harmonica part at the beginning on live boots?!)

This is definitely the song i want to hear live.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Smile
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 8:42 pm 
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Smile ..well what can you say about a perfect song that hasnt already been said :)

We need this song more often ,"live"

Sir Frank, Great writing once again. :thumbsup:

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Smile
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 10:37 pm 
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There is a portuguese word called Saudade, and nothing describes the meaning of this word better than Smile.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Smile
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 12:30 pm 
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Nice write up frank--I disagree about the harmonica--Smile desperatley needs that contrast. Otherwise the music is just sludge, but it works well when it has the harmonica offsetting it

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Smile
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 4:16 pm 
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Off He Goes

For those of you playing along at home, please keep in mind that the sequencing of Off He Goes, Habit and Red Mosquito back-to-back-to-back was done intentionally. There is a reason these three tracks are placed together smack dab in the middle of the album; there's a deeper connection behind these three songs than people tend to realize. The only reason I mention it is because many have claimed that No Code lacks cohesion, especially with the placement of Habit in between Off He Goes and Red Mosquito. We'll explore this idea deeper after we've gotten through Red Mosquito, but it's something to keep in mind for the next three tracks.

So we begin with Off He Goes, a song about a troubled friendship. But before we explore the narrative, let's begin with the music. Yes, that strange, alt-country backing behind the troubled lyrics. Again, I can relate to how off-putting this sounded to Pearl Jam fans at the time, but that was the point (I don't think I have to spend time trying to convince anyone that No Code was supposed to be a drastically different sound for the band). For some, Off He Goes gets a bad rap because of it. The music is mellow, sad and somber, which at the very least matches the lyrical content. I don't know how a musician would equate tears into notes and chords, but if they did, they'd sound a lot like some of Mike's guitar sounds, most notably right before the "And now I rub my eyes" line. The music as a whole symbolizes a mood, which is obviously explored deeper within the lyrics.

The song is broken down into three distinct parts: a disturbed man leaving his friend, the man thinking about his departed friend, and finally, the friend's return and re-disappearance. The narrator never specifically reveals why his friend is troubled (the "riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds" image is a great analogy to describe how his trouble has manifested itself physically), but does leave a few clues: "Said he'll see me on the flip side, on this trip he's taken for a ride." A flip side infers that the friend's experiences while away vs. his life at home are at two opposite ends of the spectrum, perhaps physically but most likely emotionally. We'll learn later on that the friend can be strong and enjoy himself with the narrator, so these trips of his leave him weak and buried with burden. He so dreads this off-time that he refuses to properly present himself in dress ("his perfectly unkempt clothes"). He feels no shame in allowing his outside appearance to match his internal feelings.

Now he's gone, and the narrator is left to ponder about his friend. These two have a history together ("we go way back"), and the narrator cares for him a great deal. "I wonder about his insides, it's like his thoughts are too big for his size." First, how many people, in your own personal lives, do you care enough about to wonder about their insides? And "insides," not just as their current state of mind, but as everything that has molded them into who they are today? The narrator knows this person, but doesn't quite fully understand him ("He's been taken where I don't know"). These two facts combine to create a very frustrated narrator, but not to the point that he's ready to dismiss his friend. He still keeps a picture of him around, to remind him of their friendship. And maybe to feel a little hope inside as well.

And after the tearful guitar solo, the story is concluded—to a point. Ed's vocal delivery in the song's final lines is astounding. Listen to the surprise in his voice upon recognition of his friend's return; or the baritone confidence upon the realization that his friend still smiles and is still strong; or the overwhelming joy of the laughter their reunion produces; or, finally, the sadness when he sees his friend's strain resurface on his face. The narrator runs an emotional gamut, and Ed nails each emotion consecutively, without the use of vocal overdubs. This is a fine example of how Ed, at the time, was perfecting the art of his vocal nuances and using them to his benefit, as well as to the songs' benefit as well.

But alas, this story doesn't have a happy ending. The friend is gone again, and keeps going and going until he fades from sight (as the music fades from our ears). The narrator's friend's behavior has proven to be cyclical, but the song leaves absolutely no clue as to why or how, at least within Off He Goes as a stand alone piece. Keep in mind the song that follows, Habit, and that one of the last lines of this song is "Nothing's changed but the surrounding bullshit—that has grown." Perhaps Ed was leaving us with a bit of a cliffhanger? But let's not jump the gun just yet. Right now we're simply left with a troubled friend, out there in the wilderness with someone loyal waiting in the wings. How long he'll wait before he stops turning a blind eye and his frustrations get the best of him? Well...stay tuned.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 6:03 pm 
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I'll wait for you to finish the off he goes-habit-RM run before I comment (I want to see where you are going with this) but as always, a nice write up

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:03 pm 
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Another good write up Frank, i'm enjoying this series. I think Ten, Vitalogy and Avocado are the PJ albums that strike me as having some sort of constant thematic link (maybe Riot Act as well), and i was dubious when i read your intial post about the narratives and links etc happening throughout No Code. Maybe it's not as strong as the other 3 i mentioned, but you do put forward a really good case.

In regards to Off he Goes, I remember reading an interpretation that this was about Eddie seeing the way he has been affected by the goings on of the last few years (i gather this is a common interpretation), and i find the song more interesting to view like this. A person searching for himself, and having trouble in gaining a clear perspective of what's going on and where he's going etc... in this respect the song could be seen as linking very closely to Sometimes? I also remember reading an interpretation that suggested the line "i've seen his picture, but it doesn't look the same up on the rack" could translate to mean a loved one seeing Eddie's picture from a family photo album/the mantle of a fireplace etc, and then seeing the media portaying Eddie in a different light through magazine pictures etc. I've liked that view - it could even be the closest thing to a confession by Eddie in stating how he feels forced into playing into a certain role for the media, or is pushed into this type of role (in a similar way to Corduroy i guess).

The same interpreter also thought that the line 'until a quater to ten', could in fact mean 'quater to Ten'...and link with the idea of foresight of the struggles to be had because of the success that was about to be thrust on the band and Eddie through the release of Ten....that seems a bit far fetched, and kinda lame though, so i'm not too sure about that. It could be an intended dual meaning by Ed though.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:34 pm 
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Nice Off He Goes write up. One place I differ is I always got the idea that Eddie or the person leaving was okay at the end of the song. There's no personal cliffhanger. Any cliffhanger is only with how the world (or surrounding bullshit) is gonna turn out and not the character.

One thing I love about the song is the universal appeal of the lyrics. Even the nicest person feels like an asshole at times. The most grounded person has their own means of escapes. That we all need time on our own in order to be better person and a better friend. The feeling that you're not 13 any more and it's okay to have great friends whose lives you just occassionally intersect with but love them no less. I think this is Eddie's first great grown up (non-angsty) lyric. One that shows quite introspectation, versus a here am this is how I am love me or leave now fuck off.

I've always felt that Thumbing My Way was written in much the same way, and is a follow up on this same character. Only now he's ditched the motorcycle, and is older and wiser.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:49 am 
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awesome write up Frank. Off He Goes has always been a fav of mine. You brought a lot of great point that I have thought about before.

I have also always felt that the character that leaves is Ed.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 2:16 pm 
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nice job frank... iceage and tyler too.
i can see where you're going with this to an extent; i like it.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 2:28 pm 
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i'd bet my little finger that this song was inspired by the relationship between Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty in On The Road. the "friend" character is almost identical to Neal Cassidy.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 3:06 pm 
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mastaflatch wrote:
i'd bet my little finger that this song was inspired by the relationship between Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty in On The Road. the "friend" character is almost identical to Neal Cassidy.


You could be right actually, but the guy in Off He Goes perhaps seems a little too fragile to be Neal Cassidy? Or maybe it's just the way Ed narrates it.

Have you read The Dharma Bums?


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 3:21 pm 
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iceagecoming wrote:
mastaflatch wrote:
i'd bet my little finger that this song was inspired by the relationship between Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty in On The Road. the "friend" character is almost identical to Neal Cassidy.


You could be right actually, but the guy in Off He Goes perhaps seems a little too fragile to be Neal Cassidy? Or maybe it's just the way Ed narrates it.

Have you read The Dharma Bums?

i read pretty much all of Kerouac's books save for The Town And The City, Pic and a few non-narrative ones - The Dharma Bums is actually my favorite :)
i don't feel like the friend character in OHG is fragile - can you explain you interpretation of this?

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 3:19 am 
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The version of Lo2L is pure perfection.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:28 pm 
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mastaflatch wrote:
iceagecoming wrote:
mastaflatch wrote:
i'd bet my little finger that this song was inspired by the relationship between Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty in On The Road. the "friend" character is almost identical to Neal Cassidy.


You could be right actually, but the guy in Off He Goes perhaps seems a little too fragile to be Neal Cassidy? Or maybe it's just the way Ed narrates it.

Have you read The Dharma Bums?

i read pretty much all of Kerouac's books save for The Town And The City, Pic and a few non-narrative ones - The Dharma Bums is actually my favorite :)
i don't feel like the friend character in OHG is fragile - can you explain you interpretation of this?


Yeah, the Dharma Bums is my favourite too. I really like Mexico City Blues as well...The Town and City was his only novel prior to On the Road, right? I haven't read it either, but i've heard he wasn't too happy with it, he was still trying to find a comfortable voice and writing style...i'm sure it would make for an interesting read though.

I think the reason i thought the character in OHG was fragile was based too much on Ed's delivery, and the 'pulled and tense' lyric threw me...reading through the lyrics again, i think it's clearer to see that the character is quite Moriary-esque...e.g. "he's always moving much too fast", 'his thoughts are too big for his size", and "he seems distracted" etc, etc. So yup, you've won me over with that one :)


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Off He Goes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 4:03 pm 
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iceagecoming wrote:
mastaflatch wrote:
iceagecoming wrote:
mastaflatch wrote:
i'd bet my little finger that this song was inspired by the relationship between Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty in On The Road. the "friend" character is almost identical to Neal Cassidy.


You could be right actually, but the guy in Off He Goes perhaps seems a little too fragile to be Neal Cassidy? Or maybe it's just the way Ed narrates it.

Have you read The Dharma Bums?

i read pretty much all of Kerouac's books save for The Town And The City, Pic and a few non-narrative ones - The Dharma Bums is actually my favorite :)
i don't feel like the friend character in OHG is fragile - can you explain you interpretation of this?


Yeah, the Dharma Bums is my favourite too. I really like Mexico City Blues as well...The Town and City was his only novel prior to On the Road, right? I haven't read it either, but i've heard he wasn't too happy with it, he was still trying to find a comfortable voice and writing style...i'm sure it would make for an interesting read though.

I think the reason i thought the character in OHG was fragile was based too much on Ed's delivery, and the 'pulled and tense' lyric threw me...reading through the lyrics again, i think it's clearer to see that the character is quite Moriary-esque...e.g. "he's always moving much too fast", 'his thoughts are too big for his size", and "he seems distracted" etc, etc. So yup, you've won me over with that one :)

yay!
in fact i have a hard time dissociating No Code (and Yield) from Kerouac's work and i'm not sure if it's because i was immersed in his books at the time or if Eddie was as well. wasn't it around this time period that he recorded "Hymn" with Hoovercraft for the Kicks Joy Darkness Kerouac tribute album? i think that many songs on those albums could be inspired by his litterature: Sometimes, Who You Are, Smile, OHG, Present Tense, I'm Open, GTF, Lowlight (although it's Jeff's), In Hiding and Push Me Pull Me.
anyway i may well be off on this theory and i may never know for sure but i like to think of these songs that way -

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Habit
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:25 pm 
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Habit

The narrator of Habit is an angry fellow. His raspy voice reeks of strain and wear, as if he's been screaming forever. And why is he screaming? Because he's preaching. A lot of times, the word "preach" carries a negative connotation usually associated with condescension. That may very well be true. But sometimes it just so happens that the preacher isn't looking down on his audience, but forcefully offers genuine words of wisdom. And in some instances, people can't hear us unless we scream. Whispering is for secrets; shouting is for making your point loud and clear.

So what is the narrator shouting about? The subject of Habit suffers from some sort of co-dependency, but it's not necessarily liquor or drugs (though that could easily be construed as the explicit meaning). The word "habit" means a ritual, and nothing more. Because of urban English, we've been conditioned to think the word is associated with some sort of addiction, but that's simply not the case. A habit is a tendency, not a dependency. But within the lyrics presented to us, the habit of question could very well be someone coping with an addiction or someone locking themselves away (a victim of depression). All we really know is that the narrator isn't going to stand for it anymore, and pleads that this person changes their behavior.

He comes off brash, but not unsympathetic. The key line in the song is "it's not your way." Say it out loud and ask yourself where and when you would say this to another person. The narrator knows this person well enough to make such a claim, and speaks from experience ("seen it happen to a couple of friends/seen it happen and the message it sends"). Though he most likely hasn't suffered this affliction, whatever it may be, he's seen the consequences in his life experience with others. He wants to save this person, plain and simple.

Yet he's not coy or cute in his explanation—he comes straight out and speaks to the person without dancing around the issue:

"Taking off for what's an obvious fall" (re: you're smart enough to know better)
"I'm so happy with my righteous self" (re: I get along fine and don't have to resort to your way of life)
"Never thought you'd habit" (re: I'm extremely disappointed in you)

That last line in particular is quite note-worthy. First, the narrator uses the noun "habit" as a verb, which lingually makes no sense. Perhaps it's a pun, meant to mean "have it." Again, since this habit is never clarified or explained, it would make sense that it's reduced to the word "it." People have habits; it's not uncommon to hear someone preface an admission with "I have a habit of...". But more importantly, let's look at the first three words in conjunction with "habit" and whatever that expression is meant to imply. "Never thought you'd." The narrator is laying a guilt trip on this person. He's beyond understanding and grandstanding—he wants the person to know what the fuck he feels. He's past the point of wearing kid gloves; he needs this person to examine his/her self and how outsiders see their plight. It's a call for humble humiliation, but moreso it's a call for that person to really examine themselves. This is tough love, through and through.

And, once again, the music reflects this perfectly. The guitars are loud and angry, and the tempo waaaayyyy past upbeat, courtesy of the rhythm section. The punk rock riff tells the listener that it doesn't give a fuck about being polite or subtle, echoing the narrator's lyrical intentions.

So where does this leave us? Again, no questions are answered within the song itself. But whomever the narrator is addressing, they need some time alone to think about it.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Habit
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:31 pm 
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Habit = some of the surrounding bullshit the previous characterr left us with in Off He Goes. Even when we get our lives under control we have those we love who don't have their lives under control.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Habit
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:14 pm 
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For me, Habit talks about how we can easily get acomodated because we feel a bit lost on life, so we hesitate.

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