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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:52 pm 
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id like to see you do a write up of jack irons' drum work on the album. i think it sucks balls but would be interested to see how you see its roll on the album.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Habit
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:40 pm 
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mastaflatch wrote:
tyler wrote:
stip wrote:
What do you make of the child of the 90's lyric Frank, Tyler, or someone else?
An admission by Ed that he was childish in the 90's. Being mad at the world, being mad for being mad's sake, and being mad for having your dreams come true and more is childish. I know for myself I always think I grew up when I stopped blaming others for how I am. I stopped being a child when I took responsibility for who I am. "Off He Goes" were Ed's first grown up lyrics, where he assessed who he was without blaming others for what he found and did not like about himself.

i read somewhere, maybe in Alternative Press or RS,that this was an allusion to "against the 70s" by Mike Watt...anyone able to give info on this?


well it is basically the same lyric as in the 70s with a different decade attatched, but since against the 70s is a song warning against 70s nostaliga it made a lot of sense there This one I'm not really sure about

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Habit
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 2:01 am 
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stip wrote:
mastaflatch wrote:
tyler wrote:
stip wrote:
What do you make of the child of the 90's lyric Frank, Tyler, or someone else?
An admission by Ed that he was childish in the 90's. Being mad at the world, being mad for being mad's sake, and being mad for having your dreams come true and more is childish. I know for myself I always think I grew up when I stopped blaming others for how I am. I stopped being a child when I took responsibility for who I am. "Off He Goes" were Ed's first grown up lyrics, where he assessed who he was without blaming others for what he found and did not like about himself.

i read somewhere, maybe in Alternative Press or RS,that this was an allusion to "against the 70s" by Mike Watt...anyone able to give info on this?


well it is basically the same lyric as in the 70s with a different decade attatched, but since against the 70s is a song warning against 70s nostaliga it made a lot of sense there This one I'm not really sure about


I simply think it was a 2 things:

1. an anti-drug warning, as per the rest of the lyrics. In the 90's, people should know better
2. the obvious reference to the Mike Watt song

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 2:01 am 
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Oh, and sorry for the delay. I'm gonna try to have Lukin up tomorrow.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:40 am 
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Lukin

Have you ever been so frustrated by life that you seek a place as a refuge? Somewhere you can go and not be judged by a dominant perception of who you are, but instead actually be welcomed for who you really are? This is the dilemma that the narrator of Lukin has to deal with. He yearns to escape from his public self and find peace in the company of a friend that doesn't see him as a projected image. He sees him as a person.

Ed's lyrics are autobiographical here. In an interview from last year, we've been informed of the female stalker that inspired this song. But that doesn't mean we can't all relate to how the narrator is feeling. He's a man who simply wants to be left alone, but the world will not let up. He's angry, anti-social and tired. Lukin is his temper tantrum: short and direct. Fuck the world and everyone in it. Except for maybe just one other person.

"I'm going to Lukin's
I've got a spot at Lukin's
I knock the door at Lukin's
Open the fridge, now I know life's worth."

"Now I know life's worth." I think we all have a Lukin in our lives - someone we can turn to when everything just completely overwhelms you. The narrator yearns to find peace, and presumes to do so in the company of this Lukin character, for reasons unexplained. Perhaps they share a past together, and the narrator revels in that memory when Lukin is around. Or perhaps Lukin just brings the best out of people and can instantly cheer the narrator up. It makes no difference. A space around Lukin is the cure to whatever ailment the narrator suffers from.

The narrator of Lukin is a man reaching out. Maybe not for help, but for a distraction from his present state of mind. Something haunts him, and he needs a release. We'll never know if he finds it or not. But he does have someone and somewhere to turn to, so at the very least there's hope that all is not lost yet.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:12 am 
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btw, Lukin is most likely Matt Lukin from Mudhoney
nice write-up once again Frank - i've been waiting for this one :)

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:42 pm 
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lukin is sort of like going to the one place that's familar and you won't be bothered, judged, etc. sometimes i think of the cheers theme song, "you want to go where everybody knows your name, and they're always glad you came" when thinking about the lyrics and meaning of this song.

overall just an outburst of frustration that we all feel from time to time.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:50 pm 
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dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
Lukin

Have you ever been so frustrated by life that you seek a place as a refuge? Somewhere you can go and not be judged by a dominant perception of who you are, but instead actually be welcomed for who you really are? This is the dilemma that the narrator of Lukin has to deal with. He yearns to escape from his public self and find peace in the company of a friend that doesn't see him as a projected image. He sees him as a person.

Ed's lyrics are autobiographical here. In an interview from last year, we've been informed of the female stalker that inspired this song. But that doesn't mean we can't all relate to how the narrator is feeling. He's a man who simply wants to be left alone, but the world will not let up. He's angry, anti-social and tired. Lukin is his temper tantrum: short and direct. Fuck the world and everyone in it. Except for maybe just one other person.

"I'm going to Lukin's
I've got a spot at Lukin's
I knock the door at Lukin's
Open the fridge, now I know life's worth."

"Now I know life's worth." I think we all have a Lukin in our lives - someone we can turn to when everything just completely overwhelms you. The narrator yearns to find peace, and presumes to do so in the company of this Lukin character, for reasons unexplained. Perhaps they share a past together, and the narrator revels in that memory when Lukin is around. Or perhaps Lukin just brings the best out of people and can instantly cheer the narrator up. It makes no difference. A space around Lukin is the cure to whatever ailment the narrator suffers from.

The narrator of Lukin is a man reaching out. Maybe not for help, but for a distraction from his present state of mind. Something haunts him, and he needs a release. We'll never know if he finds it or not. But he does have someone and somewhere to turn to, so at the very least there's hope that all is not lost yet.

i think its obvious why the narrator finds peace with Lukin- "open the fridge, now i know life's worth"- Lukin's fridge is loaded with beer

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:01 pm 
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warehouse wrote:
dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
Lukin

Have you ever been so frustrated by life that you seek a place as a refuge? Somewhere you can go and not be judged by a dominant perception of who you are, but instead actually be welcomed for who you really are? This is the dilemma that the narrator of Lukin has to deal with. He yearns to escape from his public self and find peace in the company of a friend that doesn't see him as a projected image. He sees him as a person.

Ed's lyrics are autobiographical here. In an interview from last year, we've been informed of the female stalker that inspired this song. But that doesn't mean we can't all relate to how the narrator is feeling. He's a man who simply wants to be left alone, but the world will not let up. He's angry, anti-social and tired. Lukin is his temper tantrum: short and direct. Fuck the world and everyone in it. Except for maybe just one other person.

"I'm going to Lukin's
I've got a spot at Lukin's
I knock the door at Lukin's
Open the fridge, now I know life's worth."

"Now I know life's worth." I think we all have a Lukin in our lives - someone we can turn to when everything just completely overwhelms you. The narrator yearns to find peace, and presumes to do so in the company of this Lukin character, for reasons unexplained. Perhaps they share a past together, and the narrator revels in that memory when Lukin is around. Or perhaps Lukin just brings the best out of people and can instantly cheer the narrator up. It makes no difference. A space around Lukin is the cure to whatever ailment the narrator suffers from.

The narrator of Lukin is a man reaching out. Maybe not for help, but for a distraction from his present state of mind. Something haunts him, and he needs a release. We'll never know if he finds it or not. But he does have someone and somewhere to turn to, so at the very least there's hope that all is not lost yet.

i think its obvious why the narrator finds peace with Lukin- "open the fridge, now i know life's worth"- Lukin's fridge is loaded with beer


I've considered that, but the fridge just might be full of food, representing a secure domestic environment.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:39 pm 
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dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
warehouse wrote:
dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
Lukin

Have you ever been so frustrated by life that you seek a place as a refuge? Somewhere you can go and not be judged by a dominant perception of who you are, but instead actually be welcomed for who you really are? This is the dilemma that the narrator of Lukin has to deal with. He yearns to escape from his public self and find peace in the company of a friend that doesn't see him as a projected image. He sees him as a person.

Ed's lyrics are autobiographical here. In an interview from last year, we've been informed of the female stalker that inspired this song. But that doesn't mean we can't all relate to how the narrator is feeling. He's a man who simply wants to be left alone, but the world will not let up. He's angry, anti-social and tired. Lukin is his temper tantrum: short and direct. Fuck the world and everyone in it. Except for maybe just one other person.

"I'm going to Lukin's
I've got a spot at Lukin's
I knock the door at Lukin's
Open the fridge, now I know life's worth."

"Now I know life's worth." I think we all have a Lukin in our lives - someone we can turn to when everything just completely overwhelms you. The narrator yearns to find peace, and presumes to do so in the company of this Lukin character, for reasons unexplained. Perhaps they share a past together, and the narrator revels in that memory when Lukin is around. Or perhaps Lukin just brings the best out of people and can instantly cheer the narrator up. It makes no difference. A space around Lukin is the cure to whatever ailment the narrator suffers from.

The narrator of Lukin is a man reaching out. Maybe not for help, but for a distraction from his present state of mind. Something haunts him, and he needs a release. We'll never know if he finds it or not. But he does have someone and somewhere to turn to, so at the very least there's hope that all is not lost yet.

i think its obvious why the narrator finds peace with Lukin- "open the fridge, now i know life's worth"- Lukin's fridge is loaded with beer


I've considered that, but the fridge just might be full of food, representing a secure domestic environment.
A fridge full of beer is way more rock n roll. I'm going for the fridge being full of beer. I think Ed probably only started drinking red wine because it's way easier to sing with your throat coated in red wine. Rod Stewart always said that was the secret to his voice, lots of red wine and smokes.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Red Mosquito
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 8:20 pm 
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tyler wrote:
dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
warehouse wrote:
dirtyfrank0705 wrote:
Lukin

Have you ever been so frustrated by life that you seek a place as a refuge? Somewhere you can go and not be judged by a dominant perception of who you are, but instead actually be welcomed for who you really are? This is the dilemma that the narrator of Lukin has to deal with. He yearns to escape from his public self and find peace in the company of a friend that doesn't see him as a projected image. He sees him as a person.

Ed's lyrics are autobiographical here. In an interview from last year, we've been informed of the female stalker that inspired this song. But that doesn't mean we can't all relate to how the narrator is feeling. He's a man who simply wants to be left alone, but the world will not let up. He's angry, anti-social and tired. Lukin is his temper tantrum: short and direct. Fuck the world and everyone in it. Except for maybe just one other person.

"I'm going to Lukin's
I've got a spot at Lukin's
I knock the door at Lukin's
Open the fridge, now I know life's worth."

"Now I know life's worth." I think we all have a Lukin in our lives - someone we can turn to when everything just completely overwhelms you. The narrator yearns to find peace, and presumes to do so in the company of this Lukin character, for reasons unexplained. Perhaps they share a past together, and the narrator revels in that memory when Lukin is around. Or perhaps Lukin just brings the best out of people and can instantly cheer the narrator up. It makes no difference. A space around Lukin is the cure to whatever ailment the narrator suffers from.

The narrator of Lukin is a man reaching out. Maybe not for help, but for a distraction from his present state of mind. Something haunts him, and he needs a release. We'll never know if he finds it or not. But he does have someone and somewhere to turn to, so at the very least there's hope that all is not lost yet.

i think its obvious why the narrator finds peace with Lukin- "open the fridge, now i know life's worth"- Lukin's fridge is loaded with beer


I've considered that, but the fridge just might be full of food, representing a secure domestic environment.
A fridge full of beer is way more rock n roll. I'm going for the fridge being full of beer. I think Ed probably only started drinking red wine because it's way easier to sing with your throat coated in red wine. Rod Stewart always said that was the secret to his voice, lots of red wine and smokes.


I'm just considering the lyrics that we're given. It's open to interpretation, based on people's subjective opinions.

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:01 pm 
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nothing makes me feel more secure in my home than when the fridge is full of beer

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 10:05 pm 
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I dont think the fridge line has to do with whats inside it, rather its about going to a place and feeling comfortable enough there to open the fridge, no need to ask or act like a guest, just be, walk around, hang out, escape the outside

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:46 pm 
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I like the sentiment behind this song, but it's never quite worked for me the way it should. I think you did an admirable job making the most of what you could here Frank

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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 2:39 pm 
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I love how this thread has spiraled into a discussion of the importance of beer to mankind. Having spent that past two months saturated in the best beers in the world, I can't disagree.

I like your explanation of the OFF HE GOES, HABIT, RED MOSQUITO trilogy. I'll hear that the next time I listen to No Code. I've always heard HABIT, RED MOSQUITO and LUKIN as a trilogy. OFF HE GOES is about what eddie feels an observer might perceive about what was happening to him, or possibly even the entire band.

Here is the inpretation that struck me on first listen. The HABIT, RED MOSQUITO and LUKIN trilogy take us inside what was happening within the band after the external observations of OFF HE GOES. It's a harrowing portrait and recalls much of the fury of Vitalogy. Most of No Code doesn't make a lot of sense without these three. They form a triangular trap: at one vertex, substance abuse and the pain of watching those around you succumb (HABIT), at the second, the poisonous miasma that surrounded their fame which affected both their physical and mental states (RED MOSQUITO), and finally, the pathological responses of others toward them once they were famous (LUKIN). All three songs have specific reference points, but together they form a much broader picture. No Code is about self-awareness and the continuing need that all humans have to seek fulfullment. The HABIT/RED MOSQUITO/LUKIN trilogy gives us an understanding of where the journey that begat No Code began.

Frank, I hope that you continue this thread. I've enjoyed it a lot.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:38 pm 
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SLH916 wrote:
I love how this thread has spiraled into a discussion of the importance of beer to mankind. Having spent that past two months saturated in the best beers in the world, I can't disagree.

I like your explanation of the OFF HE GOES, HABIT, RED MOSQUITO trilogy. I'll hear that the next time I listen to No Code. I've always heard HABIT, RED MOSQUITO and LUKIN as a trilogy. OFF HE GOES is about what eddie feels an observer might perceive about what was happening to him, or possibly even the entire band.
Cool take on the songs.

Yeah beer, you can't live without it but at least the store gives me a nickel back for every empty.

Women, you can't live without 'em but why do they have to get so upset when you leave 'em by the curb i nthe morning.

A day without pot is like night.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:53 pm 
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tyler wrote:

Women, you can't live without 'em but why do they have to get so upset when you leave 'em by the curb i nthe morning.

A day without pot is like night.


I'm kind of a night person. I like seeing stars. A day with pot is like night.

Guys can be funny that way, too. They always get upset when you go to another bar but forget to take them with you. Thank goodness there's always another one around.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 5:18 pm 
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SLH916 wrote:
tyler wrote:
Women, you can't live without 'em but why do they have to get so upset when you leave 'em by the curb i nthe morning.
Guys can be funny that way, too. They always get upset when you go to another bar but forget to take them with you. .
Well, us men are just emotionally complicated creatures.
SLH916 wrote:
Thank goodness there's always another one around.
Do you mean man or bar. Or both.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 5:22 pm 
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tyler wrote:
SLH916 wrote:
tyler wrote:
Women, you can't live without 'em but why do they have to get so upset when you leave 'em by the curb i nthe morning.
Guys can be funny that way, too. They always get upset when you go to another bar but forget to take them with you. .
Well, us men are just emotionally complicated creatures.
SLH916 wrote:
Thank goodness there's always another one around.
Do you mean man or bar. Or both.


Both, of course.


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 Post subject: Re: A guided tour through No Code: Lukin
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 3:13 am 
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Sorry guy, it's been a rough week. I'll finish this up in the upcoming week. Look out for Present Tense on Monday.

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