Board index » Word on the Street... » Food & Dining




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 171 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:34 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
we could make 17 quote pyramids on Szechuan cuisine all night long


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:35 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
Doug RR wrote:
we could make 17 quote pyramids on Szechuan cuisine all night long

:heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat: :heartbeat:

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:36 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
washing machine wrote:
Speaking of bad chinese food, I ordered this duck the other day that was dry as hell. I did not like it.

I'd never ordered duck from a chinese restaurant before. Did I get a bad one, or is it universally accepted that duck isn't the way to go when it comes to culinary chink?


make it a point to search Houston for the best tea smoked duck


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:37 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
i have never had dry duck

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:38 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
thodoks wrote:
i have never had dry duck


you gotta fu*k up real bad to get a dry duck


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:40 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
I had to google the tea duck for you all:

The duck is first marinated for several hours with a rub containing a typical combination of whole or crushed Sichuan pepper, huangjiu or baijiu (fermented or distilled Chinese wine), ginger, garlic, and salt, with much of it rubbed inside the cavity of the duck. For intensity of taste, sometimes the marinade rub is augmented with choujiu, black pepper, tea leaves, and camphor leaves. Following the marination, the duck is quickly blanched in hot water to tighten the skin, and then towel and air dried. This step ensures that the skin of the duck has a crisp texture upon completion. A wok is then prepared for smoking the duck with black tea leaves and camphor twigs and leaves. Following a smoke treatment of approximately 10-15 minutes, the duck is then steamed for another 10 minutes before being deep fried in vegetable oil until its skin is crisp.[2]
The duck is consumed wrapped in clam-shaped buns called gebao (割包).
[edit]


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:41 am 
Offline
User avatar
Red Mosquito, my libido
 Profile

Joined: Sun May 21, 2006 2:02 am
Posts: 91597
Location: Sector 7-G
Man, duck is fantastic.

_________________
It takes a big man to make a threat on the internet.


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:43 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
Doug RR wrote:
I had to google the tea duck for you all:

The duck is first marinated for several hours with a rub containing a typical combination of whole or crushed Sichuan pepper, huangjiu or baijiu (fermented or distilled Chinese wine), ginger, garlic, and salt, with much of it rubbed inside the cavity of the duck. For intensity of taste, sometimes the marinade rub is augmented with choujiu, black pepper, tea leaves, and camphor leaves. Following the marination, the duck is quickly blanched in hot water to tighten the skin, and then towel and air dried. This step ensures that the skin of the duck has a crisp texture upon completion. A wok is then prepared for smoking the duck with black tea leaves and camphor twigs and leaves. Following a smoke treatment of approximately 10-15 minutes, the duck is then steamed for another 10 minutes before being deep fried in vegetable oil until its skin is crisp.[2]
The duck is consumed wrapped in clam-shaped buns called gebao (割包).
[edit]

:li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li:

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:44 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
thodoks wrote:
Doug RR wrote:
I had to google the tea duck for you all:

The duck is first marinated for several hours with a rub containing a typical combination of whole or crushed Sichuan pepper, huangjiu or baijiu (fermented or distilled Chinese wine), ginger, garlic, and salt, with much of it rubbed inside the cavity of the duck. For intensity of taste, sometimes the marinade rub is augmented with choujiu, black pepper, tea leaves, and camphor leaves. Following the marination, the duck is quickly blanched in hot water to tighten the skin, and then towel and air dried. This step ensures that the skin of the duck has a crisp texture upon completion. A wok is then prepared for smoking the duck with black tea leaves and camphor twigs and leaves. Following a smoke treatment of approximately 10-15 minutes, the duck is then steamed for another 10 minutes before being deep fried in vegetable oil until its skin is crisp.[2]
The duck is consumed wrapped in clam-shaped buns called gebao (割包).
[edit]

:li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li:


Landmark Hotpot house on Cambie :thumbsup:


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:44 am 
Offline
User avatar
AnalLog
 WWW  Profile

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2004 12:40 am
Posts: 25451
Location: 111 Archer Ave.
Oh boy.


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:45 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
Doug RR wrote:
thodoks wrote:
Doug RR wrote:
I had to google the tea duck for you all:

The duck is first marinated for several hours with a rub containing a typical combination of whole or crushed Sichuan pepper, huangjiu or baijiu (fermented or distilled Chinese wine), ginger, garlic, and salt, with much of it rubbed inside the cavity of the duck. For intensity of taste, sometimes the marinade rub is augmented with choujiu, black pepper, tea leaves, and camphor leaves. Following the marination, the duck is quickly blanched in hot water to tighten the skin, and then towel and air dried. This step ensures that the skin of the duck has a crisp texture upon completion. A wok is then prepared for smoking the duck with black tea leaves and camphor twigs and leaves. Following a smoke treatment of approximately 10-15 minutes, the duck is then steamed for another 10 minutes before being deep fried in vegetable oil until its skin is crisp.[2]
The duck is consumed wrapped in clam-shaped buns called gebao (割包).
[edit]

:li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li: :li:


Landmark Hotpot house on Cambie :thumbsup:

i will go with significant haste

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:46 am 
Offline
User avatar
Red Mosquito, my libido
 Profile

Joined: Sun May 21, 2006 2:02 am
Posts: 91597
Location: Sector 7-G
Fuck it, let's all go.

_________________
It takes a big man to make a threat on the internet.


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:51 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
i don't much care for breaded and fried and inartfully sauced chinese fare

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:54 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
thodoks wrote:
i don't much care for breaded and fried and inartfully sauced chinese fare


i'm with you except for some soft shell crab dishes


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:04 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
i've never been able to develop a fondness for soft shell crabs

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:06 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
hot garlic and black bean sauce is key


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:07 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
doug, describe your wok situation

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:09 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
thodoks wrote:
doug, describe your wok situation


I've had it for probably 25 years...all the flavors are still in it..I only wash it with very hot water and no soap


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:10 am 
Offline
User avatar
statistically insignificant
 Profile

Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:19 pm
Posts: 25134
Doug RR wrote:
thodoks wrote:
doug, describe your wok situation


I've had it for probably 25 years...all the flavors are still in it..I only wash it with very hot water and no soap

hmmm, i use soap. is that no good?

_________________
Fortuna69 wrote:
I will continue to not understand


Top
 
 Post subject: Re: Thanksgiving Food
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:12 am 
Offline
Unthought Known
 Profile

Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 12:09 pm
Posts: 9363
Location: Manhattan Beach California
thodoks wrote:
Doug RR wrote:
thodoks wrote:
doug, describe your wok situation


I've had it for probably 25 years...all the flavors are still in it..I only wash it with very hot water and no soap

hmmm, i use soap. is that no good?


it's fine..it's just something that was told to me many years ago and I've followed the advice..I do the same thing with my favorite cast iron pan


Top
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 171 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

Board index » Word on the Street... » Food & Dining


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
It is currently Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:19 pm