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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:46 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:02 pm 
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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/m ... ?eref=sihp

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SI reports new information in the case against Lance Armstrong

Sports Illustrated is reporting new information about embattled, seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, who is the focus of a federal grand jury inquiry in Los Angeles. The investigation is headed by Jeff Novitzky of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, who previously investigated Barry Bonds and Marion Jones.

Agents have been looking into whether Armstrong was involved in an organized doping operation as a member of the team sponsored by the U.S. Postal Service from 1999 to 2004, and since August the grand jury has been hearing testimony from Armstrong's associates and confidants. In light of those proceedings, SI writers Selena Roberts and David Epstein reviewed hundreds of pages of documents and interviewed dozens of sources in Europe, New Zealand and the U.S. for a story in the Jan. 24 issue of the magazine, which will be available on newsstands Wednesday.

According to the story, "If a court finds that Armstrong won his titles while taking performance-enhancing drugs, his entourage may come to be known as the domestiques of the saddest deception in sports history."

Among SI's revelations:

• In the late 1990s, according to a source with knowledge of the government's investigation of Armstrong, the Texan gained access to a drug, in clinical trial, called HemAssist, developed by Baxter Healthcare Corp. HemAssist was to be used for cases of extreme blood loss. In animal studies, it had been shown to boost the blood's oxygen-carrying capacity, without as many risks as EPO. (Armstrong, through his lawyer, denies ever taking HemAssist.)

• One of the perks of traveling with Armstrong, former USPS rider Floyd Landis recalls, was frequent trips on private airline charters. Private airports often subject travelers to less stringent customs checks. But Landis tells SI about the day in 2003 that he, Armstrong and team members flew into St. Moritz, where customs officials requested that they open their duffel bags for a search. "Lance had a bag of drugs and s---," says Landis. "They wanted to search it, which was out of the ordinary." Sifting through Armstrong's bag, agents found syringes and drugs with labels written in Spanish. As Landis recounts, Armstrong then asked a member of his contingent to convince the agents that the drugs were vitamins and that the syringes were for vitamin injections. The agents "looked at us sideways," says Landis, "but let us through." (Armstrong denies that this incident ever occurred.)

Armstrong won that year's Tour de France by a scant 61 seconds over his archrival, Jan Ullrich of Germany. It was by far the narrowest of his seven Tour victories.

• When Italian police and customs officials raided the home of longtime Armstrong teammate Yarolslav Popovych last November, they discovered documents and PEDs as well as texts and e-mails linking Armstrong's team to controversial Italian physician Michele Ferrari as recently as 2009, though Armstrong had said he cut ties with Ferrari in 2004.

• In a letter reviewed by SI, Armstrong's testosterone-epitestosterone ratio was reported to be higher than normal on three occasions between 1993 and 1996, but in each case the test was dismissed by the UCLA lab of renowned anti-doping expert Don Catlin, whose lab tested the Texan some two dozen times between 1990 and 2000. In addition to detailing those test results, SI reveals what appears to have been a reluctance from USOC officials to sanction athletes using performance-enhancing drugs.

In 1999, USA Cycling sent a formal request to Catlin for past test results -- specifically, testosterone-epitestosterone ratios -- for a cyclist identified only by his drug-testing code numbers. A source with knowledge of the request says that the cyclist was Armstrong. In a letter responding to those requests, Catlin informed USA Cycling that his lab could not recover five of the cyclist's test results. Of the results that could be found, "three stand out," SI reports: "a 9.0-to-1 ratio from a sample collected on June 23, 1993; a 7.6-to-1 from July 7, 1994; and a 6.5-to-1 from June 4, 1996. Most people have a ratio of 1-to-1. Prior to 2005, any ratio above 6.0-to-1 was considered abnormally high and evidence of doping; in 2005 that ratio was lowered to 4.0-to-1."

While he didn't address the 6.5-to-1 result, Catlin wrote that he had attempted confirmation (a required step) on the 9.0-to-1 and 7.6-to-1 samples, and "in both cases the confirmation was unsuccessful and the samples were reported negative." (Armstrong says he has never taken performance-enhancing drugs and has never been informed that he tested positive.)

• Stephen Swart, a New Zealander who rode with Armstrong on the Motorola squad in 1995, describes the Texan as the driving force behind some of the team members deciding to use the banned blood booster EPO. "He was the instigator," Swart tells SI. "It was his words that pushed us toward doing it."

Swart, who admits to using EPO himself, also describes a hotel-room ritual in which riders pricked their fingers, put the blood in a vial, then ran it through a toaster-sized machine that provided their hematocrit levels.

Before 2001, when cycling began using a test for EPO, riders with a hematocrit level higher than 50 were subject to a 15-day ban. Swart recalls a rest-day during the '95 Tour when the Motorola riders tested their hematocrit levels. Swart was at 48. "Lance was 54 or 56," Swart recalls.

The next day, their teammate Fabio Casartelli was killed as the result of a crash while descending Col de Portet d'Aspet, in the Pyrenees. Three days later, Armstrong attacked a group of breakaway riders, soloing to victory in Stage 18, pointing to the heavens as he crossed the line, in honor of his fallen teammate. "I rode with the strength of two men today," he proclaimed. (Armstrong denies ever using performance-enhancing drugs.)

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Last edited by thodoks on Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:20 pm 
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doping? In cycling? noooooo! :arrow:

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:26 pm 
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I want to bury my head in the sand when it comes to this story.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:27 pm 
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4/5 wrote:
I want to bury my head in the sand when it comes to this story.

I felt that way at first too.

Now he's basically Rosie Ruiz.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:29 pm 
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4/5 wrote:
I want to bury my head in the sand when it comes to this story.



Yeah me too. I'm pretty disapointed... but then again.... it's cycling.

It was unreasonable probably to expect that someone could do what he did and be perfectly clean.

I'm not sure anyone that wins in the sport can be clean.... not that it makes it ok to cheat... but these guys are pushing the limits of what humans can do physically.... it is a professional sport. I can understand the why anyway but it's disapointting to me too.

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Last edited by Electromatic on Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:31 pm 
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Electro, do you no longer think his success is attributable to his cycling team?

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:37 pm 
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thodoks wrote:
Electro, do you no longer think his success is attributable to his cycling team?



Aparently if this is true the whole team was doping so that theory still holds true somewhat....

but I still believe the team had a lot to do with his success because he didn't have to work as hard as other riders at times. It's those super human rides where he blew people away that sort of give it away. (see the stage win that Floyd Landis rode to the tour win a few years ago...) It was Armstrong like. Armstrong's tour wins came in large part because of his overwhelming success in the mountains and the time trials. Many of which were team time trials. The team pulled him up and shielded him somewhat and then he took off and did the rest.

I still think what Armstrong did was amazing because it's not like he was the only one using.... but there's probably no way he wins that many without drugs.

I mean Greg Lemond and Miguel Indurain were about as good as it gets and I don't think either one won more than 3 or 4 tours total.

I don't want to believe that Armstrong did this, but given the overall evidence in other drug cases it's fairly illogical not to.

I still think those were some of the greatest cycling teams ever.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:00 pm 
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/la ... story.html

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Lance Armstrong faces fresh doping charges from USADA


By Amy Shipley, Wednesday, June 13, 11:56 AM

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency brought formal doping charges against former cyclist Lance Armstrong in an action that could cost him his seven Tour de France titles, according to a letter sent to Armstrong and several others Tuesday.

As a result of the charges, Armstrong has been immediately banned from competition in triathlons, a sport he took up after his retirement from cycling in 2011.

In the 15-page charging letter obtained by The Post, USADA made previously unpublicized allegations against Armstrong, alleging it collected blood samples from Armstrong in 2009 and 2010 that were “fully consistent with blood ma­nipu­la­tion including EPO use and/or blood transfusions.” Armstrong has never tested positive.

In February, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles ended a nearly two-year investigation into doping allegations involving Armstrong without bringing criminal charges. Armstrong’s former teammates Floyd Landis and Tyler Hamilton cooperated with federal agents in that investigation and publicly accused Armstrong of doping.

USADA is the quasi-government agency that oversees anti-doping in Olympic sports in the United States. It is empowered to bring charges that could lead to suspension from competition and the rescinding of awards. It does not have authority to bring criminal charges.

“I have never doped, and, unlike many of my accusers, I have competed as an endurance athlete for 25 years with no spike in performance, passed more than 500 drug tests and never failed one,” Armstrong said in a statement released by his publicist. “That USADA ignores this fundamental distinction and charges me instead of the admitted dopers says far more about USADA, its lack of fairness and this vendetta than it does about my guilt or innocence. Any fair consideration of these allegations has and will continue to vindicate me.”

USADA’s letter, dated June 12, alleges that Armstrong and five former cycling team associates — three doctors including Italian physician Michele Ferrari, one trainer and team manager Johan Bruyneel— engaged in a massive doping conspiracy from 1998 to 2011, and that “the witnesses to the conduct described in this letter include more than ten (10) cyclists . . .”

All of the six, including trainer Jose Pepi Marti of Switzerland and doctors Pedro Celaya of Luxembourg and Luis Garcia del Moral of Spain, face competition bans. USADA put all of the alleged violations in one letter, it stated, because it considers the six defendents part of a “long running doping conspiracy.”

The letter specifically alleges that “multiple riders with firsthand knowledge” will testify that Armstrong used EPO, blood transfusions, testosterone and masking agents, and that he distributed and administered drugs to other cyclists from 1998 to 2005. The letter alleges that numerous witnesses will testify that Armstrong also used human growth hormone before 1996.

“These charges are a product of malice and spite and not evidence,” Robert D. Luskin, Armstrong’s Washington-based attorney, said in a telephone interview Wednesday. “Nothing else explains the fact . . . they allege an overarching doping conspiracy among four teams over 14 years and Lance is the only rider that gets charged.”

Armstrong competed for the U.S. Postal Service team and later the Discovery Channel team from 1998 to 2005. In 2009, he rode for the Astana Cycling Team and on RadioShack’s team in 2010-11.

The letter further claims that Martial Saugy, the director of an anti-doping lab in Switzerland, stated that Armstrong’s urine sample results from the 2001 Tour of Switzerland indicated EPO use.

Saugy told The Post last year that Armstrong’s sample was merely “suspicious,” a designation that meant it could not be called positive. Further analysis with modern methods might bring clarity, Saugy said, but the sample no longer exists.

“We did not do the additional analysis. It will never be sufficient to say, in fact, it was positive,” Saugy said in an interview with The Post. “I will never go in front of a court with that type of thing.”

Luskin said USADA sent Armstrong a letter last week asking him to meet with anti-doping officials. Armstrong declined, believing USADA was not interested in his testimony but rather a confession, Luskin said. In its letter, USADA said “with the exception of Mr. Armstrong, every other U.S. rider contacted by USADA regarding doping in cycling agreed to meet with USADA . . .”

USADA Chief Executive Officer Travis Tygart could not be immediately reached to comment.

Though the World Anti-Doping Agency places an eight-year statute of limitations on doping allegations, USADA argues in its letter that evidence of banned acts outside of the eight-year limit can be losed to corroborate evidence within the limit, and the statute of limitations can be waived when the alleged violations were fraudulently concealed.

Armstrong, who won his last Tour title in 2005, has taken up competition in ironman triathlons, and was scheduled to compete in the Ironman France in Nice on June 24.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 12:55 am 
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Lance is a cheat. The worst of the bunch. Tricking people that he overcame cancer and won the tour de france with his shear will and hard work. The cyclists and team leaders of the USPS team should face criminal charges. They used our tax dollars to dope.

Lance deserves his fall from grace and far, far worse.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 3:00 am 
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Still have my yellow "CHEAT TO WIN" bracelet.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 5:57 am 
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thodoks wrote:
Dude's juiced.


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http://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/lance-armstrong-walks-from-drugs-fight/story-e6frg7mf-1226457357180

Lance Armstrong faces life ban, loss of titles

Image

THE US Anti-Doping Agency says it will strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and ban him from the sport for life.

Armstrong’s sensational decision to abandon his fight to defend drug charges levelled at him puts at risk his legacy as one of the greatest sportsmen of all time.

He insisted the decision was not an admission of doping but prompted by weariness with the prolonged legal dispute.

Travis Tygart, USADA's chief executive, said Armstrong would have a lifetime ban imposed as well as having the Tour titles stripped.

Armstrong asserted that USADA had no authority to take away his Tour titles.

The sport's governing body, the International Cycling Union, was expected to make an announcement of its stance later today (AEST). It had backed Armstrong's legal challenge to USADA's authority.

Armstrong, who retired last year, declined to enter USADA's arbitration process - his last option - because he said he was weary of fighting accusations that have dogged him for years.

He has consistently pointed to the hundreds of drug tests that he has passed as proof of his innocence during his extraordinary run of Tour titles stretching from 1999-2005.

“There comes a point in every man's life when he has to say, ‘Enough is enough’. For me, that time is now,” Armstrong said in a statement.

He called the USADA investigation an “unconstitutional witch hunt.”

“I have been dealing with claims that I cheated and had an unfair advantage in winning my seven Tours since 1999,” he said.

“The toll this has taken on my family and my work for our foundation and on me leads me to where I am today - finished with this nonsense.”

USADA reacted quickly and treated Armstrong's decision as an admission of guilt, hanging the label of drug cheat on an athlete who was a hero to thousands for overcoming life-threatening testicular cancer and for his foundation's support for cancer research.

“It is a sad day for all of us who love sport and athletes,” Tygart said. “It's a heartbreaking example of win at all costs overtaking the fair and safe option. There's no success in cheating to win.”

World Anti-Doping Agency president John Fahey said Armstrong's decision not to contest the charges against him was an admission that the allegations “had substance in them”.

Fahey said the United States Anti-Doping Agency acted properly in its investigations.

“I am confident and WADA is confident that the USADA acted within the WADA code, and that a court in Texas also decided not to interfere,” Fahey said.

“They now have the right to apply a penalty that will be recognised by all WADA code countries around the world.”

Armstrong refused to enter an arbitration process he believes is unfair.

USADA maintains that Armstrong has used banned substances as far back as 1996, including the blood-booster EPO and steroids as well as blood transfusions - all to boost his performance.

The 40-year-old Armstrong walked away from the sport in 2011 without being charged following a two-year federal criminal investigation into many of the same accusations he faces from USADA.

The federal probe was closed in February, but USADA announced in June it had evidence Armstrong used banned substances and methods - and encouraged their use by team-mates.

AP


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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 7:43 am 
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He insisted the decision was not an admission of doping but prompted by weariness with the prolonged legal dispute.

LOL


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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:35 pm 
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Viva Greg Lemond.

Professional Cycling is over as far as guys being clean. Open it up. I want to see what can happen when everyone is doing literally everything they can to push the limits of human performance.


None of us really "love" athletes. Most of the ones we see doing amazing things are cheating. Let's see what they can do when the entire pool is doped up.

The overall lesson is that, it's probably not possible for one person to completely dominate a sport as grueling as pro cycling for 7 years without cheating

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:50 pm 
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Electromatic wrote:
Viva Greg Lemond.

Professional Cycling is over as far as guys being clean. Open it up. I want to see what can happen when everyone is doing literally everything they can to push the limits of human performance.


None of us really "love" athletes. Most of the ones we see doing amazing things are cheating. Let's see what they can do when the entire pool is doped up.

The overall lesson is that, it's probably not possible for one person to completely dominate a sport as grueling as pro cycling for 7 years without cheating

just dont let your kids participate in any sporting event. it'll be a death sentence.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:50 pm 
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So, how am I supposed to view the history of 2004-2005, which also included USC winning a national championship and Penn State winning the Orange Bowl?


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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 4:55 pm 
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Green Habit wrote:
So, how am I supposed to view the history of 2004-2005, which also included USC winning a national championship and Penn State winning the Orange Bowl?

It's best simply not to view it.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 6:32 pm 
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Green Habit wrote:
So, how am I supposed to view the history of 2004-2005, which also included USC winning a national championship and Penn State winning the Orange Bowl?



Remember the Vote For Change tour fondly.

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:42 pm 
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im pretty sure thedocks uses PED's for his posting prestigiousness

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 Post subject: Re: Lance Armstrong is a doper
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 7:10 pm 
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Electromatic wrote:
Professional Cycling is over as far as guys being clean. Open it up. I want to see what can happen when everyone is doing literally everything they can to push the limits of human performance.


Too much money involved. Even at amateur level. Believe me, I know guys who put their health to risk for amateur races where they can earn $100 if they win. You don't have to think about what they'd do to win the tour.

Also, I find it to be very very hypocritical. Merckx was caught three times and never stripped of anything and still regarded as the greatest ever. Armstrong was never caught and is stripped of everything and regarded as the biggest cheat ever. I don't really get it. And that's coming from a Belgian where Merckx is God and cycling is incredibly popular.


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